Northern lights head south
The aurora borealis lights up the night sky in Ozark, Arkansas. (All photos AAP)

Northern lights head south

AEST 12:05, Wed Oct 26 2011
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An unusual solar storm has pulled the colourful northern lights south, treating sky watchers in the US to a rare and beautiful sight.

Space weather scientist Joe Kunches told the LA Times that when charged particles that are released by the sun hit the earth (known as coronal mass ejection), it disturbs the magnetic field and causes the lights to be seen further south.

The aurora borealis was seen or photographed in more than half of all US states, including New Mexico, Tennessee, Missouri and Virginia.

The lights are normally only visible in places further north, such as Canada and Alaska.
The aurora borealis lights up the night sky in Ozark, Arkansas. (All photos AAP)
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The aurora borealis lights up the night sky in Ozark, Arkansas. (All photos AAP)
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